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Posts Tagged ‘Linkathon’

March 31, 2011 Leave a comment

The Elephant Room edition: the conversations that somebody thought none of us would ever think we’d hear from a bunch of celebrity megachurch pastors.

This event was held at Harvest Bible Chapel in suburban Chicago and simulcast to a select number of sites in the U.S. and Canada.

There is no video or audio and I have no idea if they’ll ever make it available.

The best way to get caught up on what happened is to visit Trevin Wax’s blog, where he has posted links to the notes that two bloggers did for each session.

Trevin also posted the best tweets (Twitter hashtag: #elephantroom) from the day’s happenings.

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Linkathon 3/30, part 1

March 29, 2011 Leave a comment

Linkathon 3/23

March 22, 2011 4 comments

Chaplain Mike reviews Eugene Peterson’s The Pastor.

John Mark Reynolds calls out Peterson re: Rob Bell (I promise this is the only Rob Bell-related link I’ll put on this post!).

Todd Rhoades asks if churches discriminate against single pastors.

Jack Hayford’s radio program Living Way is now only available via podcast. I wonder if that hints at the future of other ministries on Christian radio?

David Barton says Jesus is anti-union? (HT: Andrew Sullivan)

Dan Edelen rethinks evangelicalism’s trope of faith.

Gene Vieth on the Calvinist case against Lutheranism.

Tony Campolo asks if Christianity is a casualty of war.

Ingrid Schlueter says she’s sorry. (HT: one of our numerous Linkathon readers)

Linkathon 3/16, part 1

March 16, 2011 6 comments

Martin Bashir’s interview with pastor and author Rob Bell on MSNBC (HT to poster Martin Luther’s Disciple, who linked it here at PP, and Denny Burk, who posted a transcript along with the video)

The following links touch one way or another on Christian blogland’s version of March madness: Rob Bell’s latest book Love Wins, in which many allege Mr. Bell has embraced universalism.

Kevin DeYoung posted a long critical review of the book. He’s representative of those who think Bell’s views are heretical (to put it kindly).

Julie Clawson has a more favorable view of the book. She probably is representative of those who think Bell’s views are not heretical and that he has something worthy to say to the church.

Mark Galli of Christianity Today also criticizes Bell’s points, while saying the church would be foolish to dismiss the questions he asks.

Kary Oberbrunner thinks Bell is too evasive. Margaret Feinberg isn’t sure what Bell believes and wonders who really wins.

Cathleen Falsani calls the book “a love note” to and about Jesus. Matthew Paul Turner says we shouldn’t demonize Bell and “let the matter divide us.”

Trevin Wax compares the uproar to a fever.

Carole Turner says “the various reviews and hoopla” is entertaining. Bill Kinnon finds himself confused by Calvinists again.

And Andrew Jones has one of the better observations of the whole debate I’ve read, calling the matter “a battle for the empire”.

Carl Trueman indirectly addresses the matter, saying instead that “the age old question” really is how to minister God’s grace to those who need it, and “If we really believe Matt. 16:18, I would suggest that we will not panic with every wind of false doctrine which comes our way, nor will we be intimidated by astronomical sales figures for bad books or tickets to hear false preachers.

It would be great, IMO, if everyone got saved. But the Bible clearly teaches that few will enter the kingdom of heaven…while mentioning an innumerable multitude in Revelation that made it in.

Perhaps Michael Patton’s article on why hell is eternal will be helpful to you.

Not related to Rob Bell, his book or hell but related to Reformed Calvinists: John Samson says faithful are the wounds of a friend.

Linkathon 3/9, part 1

March 8, 2011 1 comment

Linkathon 2/16, part 1

February 15, 2011 5 comments

I’ve previously linked to Anthony Bradley’s critique of the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA), but I thought – especially given a recent discussion on church planting on the Phoenix Preacher blog – that this excerpt needed to be presented. The following quote is Bradley’s commentary on Bill Bishop’s book The Big Sort:

Pulitzer-prize finalist Bill Bishop’s data-tested thesis is that social conservatives and social elites sort themselves politically and form churches around already accepted social norms. This will explain how the PCA grew and why it likely won’t grow beyond its current cultural demographic in the near furture. For example (page numbers to Bishop’s book are in parenthesis)….

…7) Low income whites, in general, have maintained their allegiance to Democrats as late as 2004. The Republican party experienced its largest growth, in past two generations, among middle- and upper-class Americans [regardless of race] (120). You will rarely find a PCA church of low income white people with allegiance to the Democratic party because low income whites are a culture many PCA’ers detest (121).

(8) Ideological and social white flight has left rural America behind (137). The most neglected and ignored churches in the PCA are rural. They have been left behind by surburban and city center white elites (137). As I’ve written before, middle-class elitism does not seem to care about poor white people.

Now, there is more than one side to every story, and I have yet to come across any critical response to Bradley’s assertions. But if there’s any truth to this, this is very disturbing to say the least. Pastors who are highly regarded by some of us are PCA. PCA pastors are influential in the Reformed church planting movement that’s become prominent over the past decade.

It’s interesting to me, now that I think about it, how there are no church plants targeted towards the trailer park, nor the projects.

I’m not a church planter, nor a pastor. I am an outsider, and a white male who is neither dirt poor nor affluent (in American terms).

Some of you are pastors, and church planters, and can comment on whether this is legit or not.

Check out this J.I Packer quotation from Tony Reinke’s blog.

Linkathon 1/26, part 1

January 25, 2011 Leave a comment

Anthony Bradley forsees the end of the Reformed missional church movement (HT: Trevin Wax).

Andy Crouch on the gospel of Steve Jobs.

Desiring God’s Scott Anderson interviews Tim Keller, part 1 and part 2

Tim Challies on the strange phenomenon of white middle-aged pastors listening to rap.

What happened when Rachel Evans tried to love God with her mind.

Dan Edelen on making sense of confusing Christian voices.

Thabiti Anyabwile is a complementarian but…women should pray in public.

Daniel Fusco feels a rant coming on.

If you’re interested in the Redemption Groups concept coming out of Mars Hill Church, here’s an interview by Desiring God’s Jonathan Parnell with Mike Wilkerson, Mars Hill Ballard’s Redemption Groups/Counseling Pastor and author of Redemption: Freed by Jesus from the Idols We Worship and the Wounds We Carry.

C.J. Mahaney on the pastor and personal criticism.

Discouraged that you didn’t keep your New Year’s resolutions? Erik Raymond has some encouragement for you.

HT: Boing Boing

Get Michael Horton’s new systematic theology for 30 percent off.